Newsletters

Tax Alerts
Tax Briefing(s)

Department of the Treasury Secretary Janet Yellen offered members of the House Ways and Means Committee limited insight as to how the Biden Administration will handle the provisions of the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act that are expiring in 2025.


The IRS has released guidance listing the specific changes in accounting method to which the automatic change procedures set forth in Rev. Proc. 2015-13, I.R.B. 2015-5, 419, apply. The latest guidance updates and supersedes the current list of automatic changes found in Rev. Proc. 2023-24, I.R.B. 2023-28, 1207.


The IRS intends to amend the base erosion and anti-abuse tax (BEAT) regulations under Code Secs. 59A and 6038A to defer the applicability date of the reporting of qualified derivative payments (QDPs) until tax years beginning on or after January 1, 2027. Until these reporting rules apply, the current transition period rules for QDP reporting will continue to apply.


In an effort to increase awareness of and participation in the alternative dispute resolution process, the Internal Revenue Service Independent Office of Appeals has formed an Alternative Dispute Resolution Program Management Office.


The IRS has released proposed regulations that provide guidance regarding information reporting of transactions with foreign trusts and receipt of large foreign gifts and regarding loans from, and uses of property of, foreign trusts. Further, the IRS has issued proposed amendments to the regulations relating to foreign trusts having one or more U.S. beneficiaries. The proposed regulations affect U.S. persons who engage in transactions with, or are treated as the owners of, foreign trusts, and U.S. persons who receive large gifts or bequests from foreign persons.


As parents, we all know that preparing a reasonable budget and sticking to it is a basic principle of good financial planning. By assisting college-bound students in developing and maintaining their own budget, parents can help students make ends meet during their college years while helping them develop good money management skills they'll use for the rest of their lives.


After your tax returns have been filed, several questions arise: What do you do with the stack of paperwork? What should you keep? What should you throw away? Will you ever need any of these documents again? Fortunately, recent tax provisions have made it easier for you to part with some of your tax-related clutter.


With home values across the country at the highest levels seen in years, you may find that you could actually have a gain from the sale of your home in excess of the new IRS exclusion amount of $500,000 ($250,000 for single and married filing separately taxpayers). In order to determine your potential gain or loss from the sale, you will first need to know the basis of your personal residence.


What do amounts paid for new swimming pools, Lamaze classes, lunches with friends, massages, and America Online fees have in common? All of these costs have been found to be legitimate tax deductions under certain circumstances. As you gather your information for the preparation of your tax return, it may pay to take a closer look at the items you spent money on during the year.


Biweekly mortgage prepayment plans are popular in the mortgage lending industry. These plans tout substantial interest savings and shortened loan terms by making two smaller mortgage payments each month instead of one large payment. Is this type of program right for you? Is a formal plan necessary?

We all know to include the amount shown on our Form W-2 as taxable income on our Form 1040, but what about those other items of income, such as severance pay, lawsuit settlements, and disability payments, that occur less frequently?


There is a new scam out there. A new technique to steal your identity. Please read the following article carefully to protect your identity